Springtime and CPAP

//Springtime and CPAP

Springtime and CPAP

Springtime and CPAP Springtime is here! Time to open the windows and let the fresh air in – along with dust, pollen and other allergens. And read our helpful springtime CPAP tips.

1. If you have spring allergies, try CPAP humidification.

If allergies are attacking your nose, it can feel more irritated when it has to warm up all that incoming CPAP air. Using your CPAP humidifier can help when you have allergies by sharing your nose’s job of warming that air, making you feel more comfortable and relaxed. It can also help if your allergies cause you to havecongestion, dry mouth or cold-like symptoms without a fever.

2. Adjust your own humidification.

If you have an Air10™ or S9™ CPAP machine, your Climate Control Auto settings will provide the best protection against rain-out (an uncomfortable condition in which humidified air cools too quickly and condenses in your mask, becoming water droplets that dampen your face). But some nights, you may want more control over your humidification, especially if you have allergies, get a cold, etc. Fortunately, setting your own humidity and temperature settings on your Air10™ or S9™ machine is easy – just follow these simple steps.

3. Check your CPAP air filter.

We recommend checking your CPAP machine’s air filter year round for dust buildup, and replacing it at leastonce a month, as needed. This is worth emphasizing in March and April when more particles both in and outside your house can find their way into your filter. (Ask your equipment provider how often you’re covered to get replacement air filters, and if you’re eligible to receive hypoallergenic filters.)

4. Still congested? Consider a full face mask.

If you’re using a nasal or a nasal pillows mask and have nasal allergies with stuffiness and congestion, you may find a full face mask easier to breathe through when your allergies flare up – especially if you also have a deviated septum. (This is one of the reasons some people prefer using two CPAP masks.) Ask your equipment provider if a full face mask could help you during your allergy season.

By |2016-03-29T22:04:46+00:00March 29th, 2016|CPAP Learning Center|0 Comments

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